Veteran Feminists of America Celebrations


 

VFA DALLAS 2010

THE GENDER AGENDA:
BEYOND BORDERS
Pursuing Women's Rights
at Home and Abroad

March 19, 2010

Click Here to Go To the Beyond Borders website


On Friday, I was fortunate to be surrounded by some of this country’s most inspirational women, who were gathered at The Women’s Museum in Dallas for the Veteran Feminists of America event “The Gender Agenda: Beyond Borders.” For the 250 of us in attendance, the event provided a chance to reflect upon women’s past, women’s present and women’s future. One hundred years ago we could not even vote; today, we are half the workforce; in the future, there’s still much to achieve. Elisabeth Archer, Ms Magazine

Gloria Steinem with
Bonnie Wheeler

How do we get beyond borders that divide women and men with common goals and interests? Sometimes borders (like the politically freighted term feminism) become barriers to common growth and change. Sometimes borders reflect economic, class, and geographic disparities. When we allow any border (even a glass ceiling) to become a boundary, we cage and limit ourselves.

Some borders – professional, political and religious – are barriers to human progress. What work can we achieve on behalf of women and girls to move beyond barriers to full empowerment? How can we transform the barriers we observe into liminal places for us to transition from old to new ways.

It's time to think beyond borders. Here at Veteran Feminists of America, we seek to move beyond the borders of conflict toward a boundless future. Work with your local and national organizations dedicated to these goals. To join VFA go to at http://www.vfa.us/

Many honorees were interviewed and videotaped by SMU students at the March 2010 Dallas conference. Unfortunately, time and resources did not permit recorded interviews with all honorees, but we would be glad to mount any videos you can send us of Second-Wave feminists discussing their commitment to women’s equality and actions on behalf of women’s equality. We are very grateful to the SMU students from the Spring 2010 course, “Back In The Day: American Activisms 1960–1980” who prepared questions for each interviewee as part of their coursework. Click here to Go To: Video Interviews


fem*in*is*m - n. the notion that women and men are equal.

American women have made extraordinary strides in the march to achieve equality. The results of this struggle are evidenced by progressive legislation including the 19th Amendment granting women voting rights in 1920 and the Fair Pay Act of 2009 removing statutory limitation obstacles when filing an equal-pay lawsuit. Our focus on March 19, 2010 was on Texas Second-Wave feminists who were honored by the national VFA Board.

The struggle for equality is not over. The Veteran Feminists of America, a national organization dedicated to honoring Second-Wave activists’ achievements and linking like-minded individuals, hosted our March 2010 forum for today's American women to discuss women's challenges at home and in less-developed countries, where there is sometimes far less recognition of women's right to equal treatment under law.

We recognized at the same time that American women still lack constitutionally guaranteed equal rights under the law at a national level. Thus this conference applauded the achievements of the past, but also sharply reminded us that we must work still for an ERA at home, at least by 2020, the centennial anniversary of 1920, the year that American women won the vote.

You who read this are the future. Your ideas and actions will influence new national and international women’s rights initiatives, a revived Equal Rights Amendment, and recognition of the ongoing need to ensure all women everywhere enjoy basic human rights.

Keep the idea of equality for all alive in your life and work!

Click Here to Go To The Speakers

Click Here to Go To the Honorees

Click Here to Go To the IMAGES of that incredible day in Dallas

CONTACT BONNIE WHEELER: bwheeler@mail.smu.edu

Comments: jcvfa@aol.com

The Gender Agenda: Beyond Borders

Pursuing Women's Rights at Home and Abroad

March 19, 2010 - VFA at the Women's Museum in Dallas:

See the Videos Now!

American women have made extraordinary strides in the march to achieve equality. The results of this struggle are evidenced by progressive legislation including the 19th Amendment granting women voting rights in 1920 and the Fair Pay Act of 2009 removing statutory limitation obstacles when filing an equal-pay lawsuit. Our focus on March 19, 2010 was on Texas Second-Wave feminists who were honored by the national VFA Board.

Many honorees were interviewed and videotaped by SMU students at the March 2010 Dallas conference. Unfortunately, time and resources did not permit recorded interviews with all honorees, but we would be glad to mount any videos you can send us of Second-Wave feminists discussing their commitment to women s equality and actions on behalf of women s equality. We are very grateful to the SMU students from the Spring 2010 course, Back In The Day: American Activisms 1960 1980 who prepared questions for each interviewee as part of their coursework.

Click Here for the for the VIDEOS

The Ultimate Sisterhood
March 23, 2010 by Elisabeth Archer
Reprint: Ms Magazine Blog:
http://msmagazine.com/blog

On Friday, March 19th,I was fortunate to be surrounded by some of this country’s most inspirational women, who were gathered at The Women’s Museum in Dallas for the Veteran Feminists of America event “The Gender Agenda: Beyond Borders.” For the 250 of us in attendance, the event provided a chance to reflect upon women’s past, women’s present and women’s future. One hundred years ago we could not even vote; today, we are half the workforce; in the future, there’s still much to achieve.

“Moments like this allow us to stop and take stock of where we are and where we have been. But they also force us to recognize how far we have yet to go,” noted honoree Dr. Rita Kirk. The smiles that spread through the great halls of the museum suggested Dr. Kirk was not alone in her enthusiasm and hopes for the future.

Ms. magazine founder Gloria Steinem delivered the keynote speech. “Radical does not mean you’re violent. It means you go to the root,” she said. She was also featured in the documentary that was screened, Sisters of ’77, about the first-ever National Women’s Conference in 1977.

“You can’t create change until you have the imagination of change,” said Gloria in the documentary. It seemed to me that the women in attendance at the event had believed in change and made life-altering changes—these women had gone to the “root.” Many of the women who were honored had sought careers in male-dominated fields. Many had fought for equality.

“We are passing the torch to our daughters and granddaughters,” said honoree Vivian Castleberry, the first woman editorial board member at the Dallas Times Herald. As members of this next generation, we owe it to the strong and powerful women who have come before us to take on the duties that come with the torch. And taking heed of Gloria’s words, we will continue to strive to get at the “root.”

Contact: jcvfa@aol.com



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